Dancing Dieramas!

Dierama (4)
The view to the dieramas from the house.

Each year the dieramas give a display that I love. They is immediately outside the window of our living room and I can watch the flower heads swing and sway with each puff of breeze. They are planted around a garden pond which is all but hidden when the dieramas are in full flower. They have been in this spot for nearly twenty years and have crossed and self-seeded over that time so that their colours are now very diverse, ranging from almost pure white though mauve, pink, red and purple to burgundy.

Dierama (3)
View to dieramas

Years ago we had a selection of named varieties; those of Irish origin were particularly of interest to us and were treasured but it would now be impossible to separate out these named varieties. The fault lies with me for while I enjoy the swaying flowers I also enjoy the swinging stems bearing the seedpods and over the years they have seeded into themselves and around the area of gravel in which they are planted so that any clump may now have flowers of various colours. It does not bother me; I enjoy them in all their colours whether named varieties or not.

Enjoy the range of colours which results from self- seeding:

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

In the last couple of years we have been more diligent in removing the seed-bearing stems. When in seed some stems are weighed to the ground and can be a tripping hazard as my unfortunate wife found to her cost when she tripped and was badly bruised by the fall. As the year progresses the older foliage becomes brown and it can be a nuisance of a job to remove it as it has to be pulled or cut one blade at a time. Impatience and annoyance has lead to the entire clumps being simply cut to the ground with a petrol-driven hedge trimmer. It may seem harsh but they send up new foliage very quickly and it seems to do no damage at all to the health of the plants. Timing is important – it is best done when the seed pods have filled well as this is the final work of the current year’s corms and the new corms will begin to grow immediately following this. So, I believe at any rate and it is a practice which has worked here.

Dierama 'Kilmurry White' (1)
Dierama ‘Kilmurry White’

We have one dierama, a kind gift last year, which we have kept well separate from the others in hope of keeping it true to name. It is the recently introduced Dierama ‘Kilmurry White’, one with pure white flowers from Paul and Orla Woods’ Kilmurry Nursery near Gorey in Co. Wexford. It appears to be a seedling from Dierama dracomontanum, one of the smaller dierama species which generally has brick red flowers. It is an excellent plant, well worth growing, and may lead you to try others in the dierama tribe.

Dierama 'Kilmurry White' (2)
Dierama ‘Kilmurry White’
Dierama 'Kilmurry White' (1)
Dierama ‘Kimurry White’
Dierama 'Kilmurry White' (3)
Dierama ‘Kilmurry White’

Paddy Tobin

To find out more about the Irish Garden Plant Society visit our website or follow us on Facebook