The Tree at the Top of the Field

The tree at the top of the field is in view from the window where I usually sit in our house. It has been part of the scenery for many years, a native oak clothed in ivy, standing proud in the otherwise tidily cut field boundary. I have photographed it many times over the years; it gives setting and interest to colourful winter sunsets and an interesting focal point to daylight shots.

Tree at the top of the field (2)

However, our recent Hurricane Ophelia toppled it, breaking the crown and leaving it lying nearby in the field. No doubt the ivy caught the wind and contributed to its demise for it was a healthy tree. It will probably lie where it is until spring as they field will not be in use until then when it will be ploughed in preparation for a cereal crop. I imagine the broken trunk will remain standing, at least a support for the ivy, and will resprout to form a crown again though hardly as shapely as the original.

Tree at the top of the field (24)

“When the oak tree is felled the whole forest echoes with its fall, but a hundred acorns are sown in silence by an unnoticed breeze” Thomas Carlyle.

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Paddy Tobin

To find out more about the Irish Garden Plant Society visit our website or follow us on Facebook

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The Poet’s Apprentice!

These  past two years or so I have been apprenticed to a poet, Mark Roper, a word sorcerer so to speak – as you see he has had some effect on me! He has never attempted, perhaps realising it would be futile on his part, to impart any guidance to me on the writing of poetry; instead, we travelled together to various locations in search of our native orchids.

A common friend brought us together though this friend does not share our interest in walking bogs, sand dunes, marshes and hills as we seek these beautiful flowers and it is often just us two or in the company of a few other like-minded people that we pursue our hobby.

This has been a particularly good year for us, especially so as a fellow enthusiast, John Fogarty, from Co. Tipperary, brought us to locations previously unknown to us and which were abounding in treasures. Although we aren’t “tickers” – those who mark off and count each species seen in a season in an almost competitive manner – we do delight in seeing something new and delight equally when a friend reports on seeing a new species though we haven’t been so fortunate to be there ourselves.

It is a quiet pastime and we are both comfortable with quietness. Silence is regular and easy and we often wander off separately when on the ground searching for orchids with a call one to the other when something of interest is found.

Mark’s interests go well beyond orchids to all aspects of our natural world. He has a particular interest in bird watching though not at all restricted to that. He has written several books of poetry and two books of local Waterford interest, “The River Book”, about the River Suir and “The Backstrand Book” about an area in Tramore.

The Bee Orchid, a particular favourite and the  title of one of Mark’s poems – see below. 

Yesterday, Saturday 21st October, Mark launched his latest book of poetry, “Bindweed” to a large, enthusiastic and supportive audience at the Imagine Festival in Waterford. While he read several of the poems he didn’t read “Bee Orchids” which I had hoped he would but I will type it below for you. (It was Mark who first showed me the Bee Orchids on the sand dunes in Tramore – the setting for the poem)

You can read more about Mark and his work at: https://markroperpoet.wordpress.com/ and order a copy of his book at www.dedaluspress.com

Bee Orchids

 

He’d been rowed

across the Rinnashark

to see them one last time

before he died

 

The photo of his hand

cupped round a flower,

a letting go

and a leaving be.

 

So hard to find them

in the kidney vetch,

in the marram grass

and the dead marram grass.

 

I found three, one inside,

two outside the dune.

On that dark evening

I took them as a sign.

 

Making

the strange meanings

you make

when you’re alone.

 

But the orchids –

their motley faces,

bright pink tricorn,

snaily horns.

 

So grave and so silly.

They stared me down.

*********************************

To find out more about the Irish Garden Plant Society visit our website or follow us on Facebook

Paddy Tobin

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the Edge!

The seasons are moving; summer is past; autumn is in and all is change! Some plants continue in fine form and are treasured for performing so late in the year while others are well past their best and have already made their way to the compost bin.

Though near  the end of their season and soon to be lifted and stored for the winter, dahlias continue to give colour in the garden. 

Three which continue to perform brilliantly

One regularly reads advice to allow herbaceous perennials to stand overwinter, to enjoy their winter hues and skeletons and to provide food and habitats for wildlife. I prefer to clear up in autumn as I dislike untidiness in the garden and also because we have a large collection of snowdrops with cultivars flowering in the garden from November to March.

Clearing up at this time of year is a good opportunity to tackle those changes one has thought of and planned during the summer. Left on the long finger they are likely to be forgotten until it is too late and next season is in full swing.

One bed in the garden was earmarked for work this autumn. Three beautiful cultivars of Campanula latiloba – ‘Hidcote Amethyst’, ‘Chattle Charmer’ and ‘Beauty of Exmouth’ – had become rampageous and had swamped a planting of nerines which, as a result of being shaded out and lacking their summer baking, had not flowered for several years. It was decision time: the campanulas and the nerines could not live together and one had to go. It wasn’t a difficult decision. The campanulas, though very pretty and colourful in summer, were ever badly behaved. They spread too quickly, were awkward to support and needed constant dead-heading to prolong flowering – they had become a nuisance whereas nerines require little attention. Once planted correctly, in a sunny and dry position with their snouts above ground, they flower reliably year after year and congestion seems only to meet with better performance.

Nerine x bowdenii Phlox variegated
Nerine x bowdenii – planted here many years ago and thriving in this dry and sunny position. The variegated phlox in the background is a little striking but seems to go well with the nerines!

The necessity of dealing with the campanula/nerine conflict was the opportunity to do a general reorganisation of that particular bed. Plants which had been merely tolerated for several years were finally dispatched and congested plants lifted and split. As there had been some over vigorous plants in the bed and we feared they might sprout again in spring those plants which we wished to retain have been lifted and potted up and will be held until late spring/early summer before being replanted. This will allow time for the offending plants to reappear and removed if any have escaped our attention on this occasion.

The scene of our work this week.

With the plants removed it was an ideal time to add compost to the bed. The soil level had dropped a little while nerines and bearded iris prefer the best of drainage in a good sunny position.

Compost heap
The source of all goodness! The compost heap being emptied – how quickly it empties!
Scissors
Perhaps this was the real edge. The compost heap regularly reveals lost tools and on this occasion it was this small scissors which came as a very kind gift with a twine holder. It’s cutting days are over.

Gardening is a repetition of these routine tasks; it is neither often exciting nor glamorous but it is pleasantly enjoyable and we will look forward to this bed next year and imagine it will have been improved hugely – optimism and high hopes!

Paddy Tobin

To find out more about the Irish Garden Plant Society visit our website or follow us on Facebook

A Welcome Wasp!  

Native orchids have captured  my heart – and addled  my brain – and days out have been full of fabulous finds, good company, beautiful plants and one outstanding highlight.

Co. Tipperary has featured very strongly in this year’s itineraries as a friend with local knowledge has brought us to some very special sites and plants. In late April we visited an area with Green Veined Orchid, an uncommon native orchid and a very pretty one. We went, on the same day, to a wood where Bird’s Nest Orchid was simply magical.

Anacamptis morio Green Veined Orchid (33)
Green Veined Orchid, Anacamptis morio
Neottia niduavia (40)
Bird’s Nest Orchid, Neottia nidus-avis

An early visit to The Burren lead to innumerable Early Purple Orchids, spectacular Western Marsh Orchids on a busy roadside and the almost impossible to see Fly Orchid.

Orchis mascula Early Purple Orchid (24)
Early Purple Orchid,  Orchis mascula
Dactylorhiza occidentalis Western Marsh Orchid (6)
Western Marsh Orchid, Dactylorhiza occidentalis
Ophrys insectifera Fly Orchid (20)
Fly Orchid, Ophrys insectifera

The Bee Orchid is a delight to everybody who sees it with its smiling face and unusual and attractive colouring and, of course, the ingenious design of the flower which mimics a bee so well that bees flock to assist with pollination. There is a much rarer white (some say, yellow) form which flowered in abundance on one roadside verge this year and more than bees were attracted by its beauty.

Ophrys apifera Bee Orchid (29)
Bee Orchid, Ophrys apifera
Ophrys apifera Bee Orchid (5)
Bee Orchid, Ophrys apifera
Ophrys apifera var.  chlorantha  (7).jpg
White Bee Orchid, Ophrys apifera var. chlorantha

An outing to a bog brought us to two exceptionally beautiful orchids, The Marsh Helleborine and the Lesser Butterfly orchids. This was a special day, one of several this year, and the Marsh Helleborine, it was agreed, was one of the most beautiful flowers one could enjoy. The enjoyment was added to by the presence of innumerable Common Spotted and Heath Spotted Orchids while a short spin in the car afterwards brought us to a huge population of Pyramidal Orchid and Common Twayblade.

DSC_0048
Marsh Helleborine,  Epipactis palustris
DSC_0020
Marsh Helleborine,  Epipactis palustris
DSC_0133
Lesser Butterfly Orchid, Platanthera bifolia
DSC_0121
Lesser Butterfly Orchid, Platanthera bifolia

The more regularly seen Common Spotted Orchid, Heath Spotted Orchid, Pyramidal Orchid and Common Twayblade remain beautiful and charming each time they are seen but one becomes drawn to the rare, the unusual and novel. The next new one is always more interesting than the previously admired and beloved.

DSC_0005
Common Spotted Orchid, Dactylorhiza fuchsii
Dactylorhiza maculata Heath Spotted Orchid Na Circíní (27)
Heath Spotted Orchid, Dactylorhiza maculata
Anacamptis pyramidalis Pyramidal Orchid (19)
Pyramidal Orchid, Anacamptis pyramidalis, with a Six-Spotted Burnet Moth
Neottida ovata Common Twayblade Dédhuilleog (2)
Common Twayblade, Neottida ovata 

A recent visit to sand dunes in Co. Wexford brought two exceptional finds. My companion on these outings – I refer to him as “Hawkeye” for his skill at spotting those uncommon plants which make a day out special – came on a white form of the Pyramidal Orchid, a beautiful thing which made our day.

Anacamptis pyramidalis Pyramidal Orchid White form (3)
A rare white form of the Pyramidal Orchid, Anacamptis pyramidalis,

Shortly afterwards I came on a Bee Orchid with what I thought was an odd shape and colour but, because of my inexperience and lack of knowledge and that it resembled something quite rare, I was reluctant to put a name to it. However, I was writing to Brendan Sayers at the National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin, on another matter and attached a photograph for his attention. Brendan is the author of “Ireland’s Wild Orchids – A Field Guide”. Brendan replied, wondered if I had found a Wasp Orchid, Ophrys apifera var. trollii, and asked for more photographs for clarification. Photographs have since been sent to other experts and the identification has been confirmed – the narrow tip on the lip of the orchid is a distinguishing feature.

Ophrys apifera Bee Orchid wiith pale markings (7)
The Wasp Orchid, Ophrys apifera var. trollii
Ophrys apifera Bee Orchid wiith pale markings (2)
The Wasp Orchid, Ophrys apifera var. trollii
Ophrys apifera Bee Orchid wiith pale markings (4)
The Wasp Orchid, Ophrys apifera var. trollii
Ophrys apifera Bee Orchid wiith pale markings (9)
The Wasp Orchid, Ophrys apifera var. trollii. The narrow tip to the lip, labellum, is a distinguishing feature and this is the first time it has been recorded in Ireland. 

Just another orchid? It seems that this is the first time this orchid has been found in Ireland, a new record and a cause of excitement for orchid enthusiasts some of whom will travel over the weekend in hopes of seeing it in flower. Of course, I’m chuffed to have found it and it certainly is my highlight of the year.

Paddy Tobin

To find out more about the Irish Garden Plant Society visit our website or follow us on Facebook

 

 

The Fools’ Outing

There is available to us all the most wonderful nature reserve and wildflower preservation area and these are on the verges of our national road network. Many of these roads have wide verge and some have wonderfully steep banks. These latter are especially excellent as their slope makes grass cutting too awkward  and wildflowers are allowed to grow naturally. These areas are, in fact, the closest we have in most areas of the country to the natural meadows of days now long gone. Of course, they do lack grazers and cannot be maintained in the traditional manner of old meadows  – though we still see the occasional horse grazing the long acre!

Roadside - site of Ophrys apifera Bee Orhid (1)
Roadside verges and banks can be rich in wildflowers

Roadside - site of Ophrys apifera Bee Orhid (4)

Many local authorities – perhaps, being clever and adopting a present gardening fashion for wildflower meadows – have stopped cutting the grass on these verges. This certainly must save them a great deal of time and money and clearly fulfills their brief of caring for wildlife, wildflowers etc. I do hope it becomes a widespread practice to leave the verges to nature. I can understand the need to prevent the growth on the verges tumbling on to the roadway and see the sense in maintaining a narrow strip immediately to the side of the road but leaving the remainder to its own devices.

These roadside verges can be home to some of our most scarce and most elusive wildflowers. A few weeks back the telephone and Facebook Messenger was busy with reports of a population of an especially interesting and rare variety of the fabulous Bee Orchid. It began with the information that it had been spotted on a roadside in Co. Tipperary some years back. I mentioned this to an enthusiast who lived in the general area and he began his search and it wasn’t long before he found a plant, and another, and another until he realised he had found a significant population. The word went out and we were off! The Fools’ Outing! Four senior and one junior member – it is such a joy to see a junior member, the future lifeblood of any group!

Ophrys apifera var. chlorantha (25)
Ophrys apifera var. chlorantha – a pale form of the Bee Orchid

Ophrys apifera var. chlorantha (18)

Ophrys apifera var. chlorantha (26)

Sat. nav. coordinates make arriving at an exact location such a doddle these days and we pulled into the road verge within steps of our quarry. I am old, retired, and at times think I am very silly and foolish to be so delighted by the sight of a pretty little flower but I also consider myself very fortunate that such a little thing can make me so very happy. It is a childish feeling, the joy of discovery and the marvelling at the beauty of nature and I hope it remains with me forever. I noted that the other Fools were just as happy and delighted as I was so I was in good company!

Our friend had brought us to a population of Ophrys apifera variety chlorantha – a pale variety of the Bee Orchid. The Bee Orchid delights everybody who sees it – a flower that has developed to resemble a bee so as to attract the bees to come and pollinate it. Such a clever ingenious development, truly amazing! The more common Bee Orchid is quite strongly marked while this variety is much more pale. Sand dunes seems to be an especially good location to see Bee Orchids and steep road verges with good drainage and less than lush grass growth seem to offer the conditions they require also.

Ophrys apifera (6)
This is the Bee Orchid, Aphrys apifera, a wonderfully designed and coloured flower

Ophrys apifera (9)

Ophrys apifera (8)
The daisies give a good indication of the size of the Bee orchid – quite a small thing and it can be difficult to spot but after spotting one your eye seems to easily find another and another.

We ooooed and aaaaaaawwwed these pale Bee Orchids for a considerable time and took photographs of each and every one of them from every possible angle so that we could revisit the occasion later on our laptop screens. Passers-by must have wondered what we were up to – people lying on the grassy verge pointing cameras, seemingly, at the ground.

We explored further along this stretch of road and found a good population of the usual Bee Orchid as well as small numbers of Western Marsh Orchid, Common Spotted and Pyramidal Orchid as well as the uncommon broomrapes. We have had reports – from our intrepid explorer of this area – of a very healthy and numerous population of the Pyramidal Orchid not too far away on the road.

Here are a number of our other finds along this roadside:

Anacamptis pyramidalis Pyramidal orchid (2)
Pyramidal orchid, Anacamptis pyramidalis 
Dactylorhiza fuchsii Common Spotted Orchid (34)
Common Spotted Orchis, Dactylorhiza fuchsii
Dactylorhiza fuchsii Common Spotted Orchid White (2)
A nearly pure white variant of the Common Spotted orchid
Neottia ovata Common Twayblade (10)
Common Twayblade – Neottia ovata
Neottia ovata Common Twayblade (13)
Common Twayblade – Neottia ovata 
Dactylorhiza occidentalis Western Marsh Orchid (2)
Western Marsh Orchid – Dactylorhiza occidentalis. This is a species which grows only in Ireland. Note: We did wonder about the identification of this orchid when we were at the site and I have received a comment that it might be of mixed blood – something common among the Dactylorhizas. It would appear it has some Common Spotted Orchid blood in it.

These road verges are treasure troves of wildflowers and provide some of the last remaining areas of undisturbed land where they may flourish. I don’t imagine it would be a great challenge for local authorities or the national road authority to maintain these verges in a manner necessary for road safety yet suitable for these wonderful wildflowers.

Oooh, “Fools”?  The Fellowship of Old Orchid Lovers!  We may as well laugh at ourselves as we enjoy life!

Paddy Tobin

 

Post Scriptum: By coincidence, I read this article from the Irish News of a great success in Northern   Ireland.

To find out more about the Irish Garden Plant Society visit our website or follow us on Facebook

 

 

Orchid Spotter on Board!

Orchid spotters are well – though not widely – known as a grave danger on our roads. That ubiquitous “Baby of Board” seen on the back of many cars is really quite ineffective and were it to be replaced by “Orchid Spotter on Board” our roads would be far safer. We see the “Baby of Board” notice and, though it may be an appeal for us to drive carefully for the sake of that car’s young passenger, it doesn’t quite catch other drivers’ attention for, after all, a child on board poses little or no threat to other road users. On the other hand, “Orchid Spotter on Board” suggests that an obsessive nutcase is driving – or, at least, distracting the driver – and that sudden, unexpected, erratic, even dangerous, manoeuvres are quite likely.

Dactylorhiza occidentalis Western Marsh Orchid (1)
Such temptation to the Orchid Spotter – a beautiful clump of Western Marsh Orchid on a  roadside verge

Let me explain, for I have recently gained admission to that group – Orchid Spotters Unleashed. When we travel together during orchid season, May and June of each year, my wife now insists on driving with the kind suggestion that she is so doing that I might be free to scan the roadside verges. We both know that she does this for safety reasons but after nearly forty years of marriage we can both live comfortably with the pretence of kindness – it is less contentious. The sight of an orchid on the road verge – that deliciously rich purple of the Western Marsh Orchid, for example, – can not only take the orchid spotter’s eye off the road but can also, for obvious reasons, take the car off the road also so it really is best if the orchid spotter is not the one holding the steering wheel. Do notice that I didn’t say such person was “in control” of the steering wheel; holding the wheel while scanning the verges is not quite conducive to road safety.

Dactylorhiza occidentalis Western Marsh Orchid (9)
Western Marsh Orchid – who wouldn’t stop for these!

Dactylorhiza occidentalis Western Marsh Orchid (5)

Even with the safety driver in place an outburst of “Look, Western Marsh, pull over” can be a challenge to the most careful of drivers especially when it comes on a narrow winding road with no hard shoulder south of Ennistymon or that clump on the bend outside Pallasgreen. The orchid spotter was anxious to investigate and photograph while the driver was concerned with lesser matters, such as the preservation of life and limb.

I am not the only such Orchid Spotter. A friend sent on a photograph today of a beautiful form of the Bee Orchid – quite uncommon in its usual form but a divine rarity in the pale form he found today – spotted as he drove along the road and he felt “compelled” to swing the car around to have a closer look. He, the car and the orchid survived though I do recommend he bring his safety driver along in future though, thinking of it now, it may be the case – as he is a fully fledged Orchid Spotter, not just a novice as I am – that, perhaps, his safety driver has simply had too many scares, has a strong desire to live a quieter and less dangerous life and is no longer willing to endure the stresses and strains of the position. Good and devoted safety drivers are hard to come by.

bee orchid
I won’t identify my friend but you can see why he might be distracted. Ophrys apifera var. chlorantha

A friend travelling in France at present posted some photographs today of a similar roadside stop to view the roadside orchids. Pyramidal Orchids on the roadside were her distraction but, thankfully, the attraction was navigated and enjoyed safely. However, it does show that this is an international phenomenon and there may be need to translate my suggested “Orchid Spotter on Board”.

pyramidal orchid alice munsey on facebook
The distractions on a French roadside! A magnet to the Orchid Spotter!

Do drive carefully and be aware of this special group of people on our roads at the moment!

Paddy Tobin

To find out more about the Irish Garden Plant Society visit our website or follow us on Facebook

Heritage Irish Plants Launch – Opening Remarks by Martyn Rix

On November 22 2016 the Irish Society of Botanical Artists and the Irish Garden Plant Society had the great honour of welcoming Martyn Rix to the National Botanic Gardens. Martyn had generously accepted the invitation to come to launch Heritage Irish Plants – Plandaí Oidhreachta. As the time for speeches approached, the crowd of attentive gardeners, artists and guests crammed into the gallery that held stacks of books and catalogues along with the 62 paintings used to illustrate the latest book to celebrate Irish plants and horticulture. As the large attendance inhibited our ability to take in all that Martyn had to say I asked if he would, in the modern sense, put pen to paper for us. And he did.

rix_opens
Martyn Rix at the opening of the Heritage Irish Plants/Plandaí Oidhreachta exhibition in November 2016 at which he launched the book.

Martyn began with by remembering that some of his most enjoyable and formative years were spent at Trinity College Dublin and when reading the introduction to the book he remarked that …

I was interested in the story that Charles Nelson tells about the Provost Mahaffy, a great classicist and fancier and collector of snowdrops. On a visit to Athens in 1884, Mahaffy collected an Autumn-flowering snowdrop which Frederick Burbidge, the director of the Trinity College botanic garden in Ballsbridge, named Galanthus rachelae, after Mahaffy’s elder daughter. It was growing on Mount Hymettus, east of Athens, then covered in spiny Euphorbia acanthothamnos (spiny cushion). Even in classical times, Hymettus was famous for its honey, and the spurge is a great source of honey in early spring.

Euphorbia acanthothamnos pm1

Euphorbia acanthothamnos, Peter A. Mansfeld via Wikimedia Commons

A few years later, Mahaffy visited Mount Athos, famous for its monasteries, and collected another snowdrop, which was named after his younger daughter, Elsa.  This was a dwarf, early-flowering Galanthus reginae-olgae.  Both were planted at Glasnevin but by 1948, even Lady Phylis Moore–Irish gardener and wife of the Director of the botanic gardens at Glasnevin, Dublin–could find no trace of either. 

It was then that we see the logic in the Irish Society of Botanical Artists and the Irish Garden Plant Society desire to have Martyn Rix launch the new book. Martyn Rix is the current Editor of Curtis’s Botanical Magazine, the longest running botanical periodical. Through this work and his many other publications he has built an incredible knowledge of the art of plant portraiture. Martyn continued…

Rachel’s snowdrop is, however, preserved as a painting by E.A. Bowles (an early snowdrop enthusiast) in the Royal Horticultural Society’s Lindley Library, and this would be a guide to anyone who might rediscover the original clone surviving in an Irish garden.

Curtis’s Botanical Magazine has been a source of paintings of wild plants in cultivation, since its inception by William Curtis in London in 1789.  Initially most of the flowers illustrated were grown in the Chelsea Physic Garden, or in Curtis’s own botanic garden in South Kensington,  but from an early date, Ireland provided some of the models. Charles Nelson has identified one of the earliest, dating from 1810. This was Leptospermum lanigerum, from the east coast of Australia, grown in the Dublin Society’s garden at Glasnevin, which had been founded in 1795.

In the 1830s William Hooker, then in Glasgow, took over the editorship of the magazine, and again obtained plants from Glasnevin, notably those collected by John Tweedie in the Argentine between 1836 and 1854. Twelve of Tweedie’s introductions are illustrated in the magazine; Tweedie is remembered by Tweedia coerulea, an Asclepiad with flowers of a unique shade of pale greenish blue. It is more correctly known today as Oxypetalum coeruleum.

Oxypetalum caeruleum

Oxypetalum caeruleum By Kurt Stüber via Wikimedia Commons

Tweedie also introduced the wonderfully scented Sinningia tubiflora.

Sinningia tubiflora illustration

Sinningia tubiflora illustration by Swallowtail Garden Seeds from Santa Rosa, California via Wikimedia Commons

A less familiar Illustrator’s name is then introduced to us by Martyn…

One Dublin-born artist has, until now, received little recognition. He is A.F. Lyndon (1836-1917),  who travelled widely in Bermuda and New Brunswick in particular,  before settling in Driffield in Yorkshire, to work for the engraver and publisher Benjamin Fawsett.  Lyndon drew the illustrations for Lowe’s Our Native Ferns, and Beautiful-leaved Plants, as well as the Revd. William Houghton’s British Freshwater Fishes.

freshwaterfish_lydon
One of Lyndon’s illustrations for British Freshwater Fishes by Rev. William Houghton

It is then that the setting of the National Botanic Gardens for the launch and as a ‘home’ for both Societies is broadened…

While the Hookers, father and son, were directors of Kew for the last 70 years of the 19th century, the reign of the Moores at Glasnevin lasted 84 years, from 1838 until 1922. The elder Moore is remembered in Crinum moorei, introduced from Natal, and illustrated in Curtis’s magazine in 1863.  Large clumps of the original plants still thrive at Glasnevin.

crinum_moorei
Crinum moorei from Brendan Sayers. 

The last of the Moores was Lady Phylis Moore, much younger than her husband, who died in 1949, and who was still spoken of in hallowed terms by gardeners in Ireland in the 1960s, though, sadly, I never met her.

W.E. Trevithick (1899-1958) contributed around 60 plates to Curtis’s Botanical Magazine. He was born when his father was head gardener to Lord Headfort in his great garden near Kells. The white, scented Rhododendron headfortianum was painted from the garden, as well as Lilium formosanum and Tsuga chinensis. His son, also William Edward, was a gardener at Headfort from the age of 13, then at Glasnevin, and finally at Kew, where he worked in the herbarium.

It is not only the mention of orchids, a particular favourite plant family of mine but also the move to more recent history that made me even more attentive to Martyn’s words…

Orchids were a particular favourite of the younger Sir Frederick Moore, and I remember the wonderful display in the glasshouses at Glasnevin in the 1960s, when I came to Dublin to read botany at Trinity under David Webb. Another speciality were the hanging baskets of Dampiera, formerly Clianthus formosus, with silver leaves and striking red and black flowers.

In these years Lord Talbot de Malahide was building up his collection at Malahide Castle, and was a friendly host for lunch on Sunday, followed by a tour of the garden and tea upstairs in the drawing room, presided over by his sister Rose. Many of his plants came from the Malahide estate in Tasmania, and were the models for paintings by Margaret Stones, the great Australian flower painter, in the Endemic Flora of Tasmania. He also grew plants from other areas, and I collected seeds for him in Turkey and Iran, with Gillie Walsh-Kemmis and Michael Walsh in 1968 and, with Audrey Napper from Loughcrew, in 1969.

Wendy Walsh and her family were also great hosts, as well as being very artistic.  It was when Michael was working in Kiribati, in the South Pacific, in 1970, that Wendy visited him and began painting flowers again.  As well as her paintings for Irish postage stamps, she painted several plants for Curtis’s Botanical Magazine, including Iris lazica, which Michael had collected in Turkey, and Deutzia purpurascens ‘Alpine Magician’, collected by Reginald Farrer in Burma in 1919, and preserved at Glasnevin.

Wendy’s main work was published in a series of beautiful books in co-operation with Charles Nelson, on Irish plants, both native and cultivated. These will be her most lasting legacy.

And to round it all off…

It is great to see this theme being carried on in the present exhibition by young botanical artists at work today.  Deborah Lambkin is now a regular contributor to Curtis’s Botanical Magazine, specialising in exotic orchids, and Susan Sex has recently painted native species for the Magazine.  Lynn Stringer is also a regular contributor, painting new introductions grown by Séamus O’Brien at the National Botanic Garden at Kilmacurragh, Co. Wicklow.

It was a great honour to be at the podium alongside Martyn Rix. We, the Irish Garden Plant Society and the Irish Society of Botanical Artists, owe him a great debt of gratitude in his acceptance to launch the book and open the exhibition but also for his generosity while visiting. As often happens, events will go by and in the excitement of it all some details will be forgotten. I am happy to say that this will not happen to Martyn Rix’s words of the day.

Brendan Sayers